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Number of results: 5
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Abstract

Main aim of this study is to combine the characteristics of the sonic crystal (SC) with acoustic panels and porous materials to improve the sound transmission loss (STL) through the triple-panel structure. SCs cause a bandgap centered around a certain frequency (Bragg’s frequency) due to generation of destructive interference. Initially, an analytical method is developed that extends the previous theory of double-panel structure to predict STL through a triple-panel structure. Finite element (FE) simulations are performed to obtain the STL through the triple-panel, which are validated with the analytical predictions. Various configurations are analyzed using the FE method based on the method of inserting the porous material and SCs between the panels to address the combined effect. STL through the triple-panel structure is compared with that through the double-panel structure having the same total weight and total thickness. It is found that the combined structure of the triple panel and the SC with glass wool as filler gives the best soundproof performance for the same external dimensions. For narrow air gaps, filing with glass wool is more advantageous than inserting one row of SC. In addition, the triple panel combined with a SC has better soundproofing than the two-panel counterparts.
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Abstract

This paper presents an approximate analytical model for estimating the transmission loss (TL) of a finite rectangular plate in the low frequency range, which is based on the modal summation approach (MSA) taking into account the modal radiation impedance and fluid loading. The mode-dependent radiation resistance is calculated using the Rayleigh integral. The fluid loading is taken into account through the natural frequency modified by the added mass. The results are compared with the ones of Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) coupled with FEM and FEM coupled with BEM. In addition, the effects of the various vibration modes and the fluid loading on TL, and a way for reducing the calculation time are discussed.
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Abstract

The shipping noise near channels and ports is an important contribution to the ambient noise level, and the depth of these sites is often less than 100 m. However less attention has been paid to the measurement in shallow water environments (Brooker, Humphrey, 2016). This paper presents extensive measurements made on the URN (underwater radiated noise) of a small fishing boat in the South China Sea with 87 m depth. The URN data showed that the noise below 30 Hz was dominated by the background noise. The transmission loss (TL) was modelled with FEM (finite element method) and ray tracing according to the realistic environmental parameters in situ. The discrepancy between the modelled results and the results using simple law demonstrates both sea surface and bottom have significant effect on TL for the shallow water, especially at low frequencies. Inspired by the modelling methodology in AQUO (Achieve QUieter Oceans) project (Audoly et al., 2015), a predicted model applied to a typical fishing boat was built, which showed that the URN at frequencies below and above 100 Hz was dominated by non-cavitation propeller noise and mechanical noise, respectively. The agreement between predicted results and measured results also demonstrates that this modelling methodology is effective to some extent.
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Abstract

The modern cabin of heavy duty machines have to fulfil a number of requirements which deal with operators' work comfort. More and more often, the vibroacoustic and thermal comforts decide about the cabin quality. This paper presents principles of acoustic and thermal calculations as well as their use in combined assessment.
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Abstract

The paper presents an extensive review investigating the practical aspects related to the use of single- number ratings used in describing the sound insulation performance of partition wall panels and practical complications encountered in precise measurements in extensive frequency range from 50 Hz to 5 kHz. SWOT analysis of various single number ratings is described. A laboratory investigation on a double wall partition panel combination revealed the significant dependence of STC rating on transmission loss at 125 Hz attributed to 8 dB rule. An investigation conducted on devising alternative spectrums of aircraft noise, traffic noise, vehicular horn noise and elevated metro train noise as an extension to ISO 717-1 Ctr for ascertaining the sound insulation properties of materials exclusively towards these noise sources revealed that the single-number rating Rw + Ctr calculated using ISO 717-1 Ctr gives the minimum sound insulation, when compared with Rw + Cx calculated using the alternative spectrums of aircraft noise, traffic noise, etc., which means that material provides a higher sound insulation to the other noise sources. It is also observed that spectrum adaptation term Cx calculated using the spectrum of noise sources having high sound pressure levels in lower frequencies decreases as compared to ISO 717-1 Ctr owing to significant dependence of Ctr at lower frequencies.
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