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Abstract

The strength of conveyor belts splices made in mines rarely reaches full belt strength. It consists of a number of factors. The primary is the method of their construction and proper selection of ingredients. The significant impact has also has splice quality covering both keeping proper geometry matched to the belt construction and belts working conditions and adherence to the best practices in the field of technologies of their construction.Difficult conditions in underground mines and pressure on reducing conveyor downtime (avoiding production losses) is reflected by a drop in static and dynamic splices strength. This is confirmed by numerous studies of belt splices strength and fatigue life conducted in the Laboratory of Belt Conveying (LTT) within the framework of research and expert opinions commissioned by belt manufacturers and their users. The consequence of too insufficiently low belt splices strength is their low durability, decreasing reliability and, consequently, higher mining transportation costs. Belt splices are in fact the weakest link in the serial structure which form closed loops of interconnected belt sections working in series of conveyors transporting excavated material in the mine. The article presents the results of simulation analyzes analyses investigating how the increase of belt splices durability may contribute to the reduction of transportation costs in the underground mines.
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Abstract

This paper analyses the influence of the applied microwave power output on the intensification of drying in the context of process kinetics and product quality. The study involved testing samples of beech wood (Fagus sylvatica L.). Wood samples were dried in the microwave chamber at: 168 W, 210 W, 273 W, 336 W and 378 W power output level. For comparison, wood was dried convectively at 40 ◦C and 87% air relative humidity. The analysis of drying process kinetics involved nonlinear regression employing the Gompertz model. Dried samples were subjected to static bending tests in order to specify the influence of the applied microwave power on modulus of elasticity (MOE) and modulus of rapture (MOR). The obtained correlations of results were verified statistically. Analysis of drying kinetics, strength test results and Tukey’s test showed that the applied microwaves of a relatively low level significantly shortened the drying time, but did not cause a reduction in the final quality of dried wood, compared with conventional drying.
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Abstract

An uniaxial compression mechanical model for the roof rock-coal (RRC) composite sample was established in order to study the effects of height ratio of roof rock to coal on the structural strength of composite sample. The composite sample strengths under different height ratios were established through stress and strain analysis of the sample extracted from the interface. The coal strength near the interface is enhanced and rock strength near the interface weakened. The structural strength of composite sample is synthetically determined by the strengths of rock and coal near and far away from the interface. The area with a low strength in composite sample is destroyed firstly. An analytical model was proposed and discussed by conducting uniaxial compression tests for sandstone-coal composite samples with different height ratios, and it was found that the structural strength and elastic modulus decrease with a decrease in height ratio. The coal strengths far away from the interface determine the structural strengths of composite sample under different height ratios, which are the main control factor for the structural strength in this test. Due to its lowest strength, the rock near the interface first experienced a tensile spalling failure at the height ratio of 9:1, without causing the structural failure of composite sample. The coal failure induces the final failure of composite sample.
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