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Number of results: 5
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Abstract

Aluminium is one of the main soil components. Usually it is a part of non-toxic aluminosilicates but in low pH values its mobility is higher and - especially in monomeric form is toxic for plants. Selenium is an essential element necessary for animals and humans. Its compounds have anticancer and anti mutagenic character. However, its high uptake from environment, e.g. with food or water could lead to various diseases including embryonic deformity, decreased hatchling survival and death to aquatic organisms. Soil contamination with aluminium leads to disturbances in plant growth as a result of low calcium and magnesium uptake. High concentrations of selenium lead to its accumulation in plant tissues what is the beginning of selenium fate in food chain. In this work a cultivated layer of soils located near five industry plants in the town of Opole (southern Poland) were investigated. Aluminium and selenium content in soils is an effect of two factors: its natural occurrence in rocks (natural content) and human activity - especially chemicals from agriculture, industrial and transport pollutants. Aluminium was determined in the range of 3440 to 14804 mg/kg d.w. Obtained results of selenium concentration covered the range from 27.1 to 958.1 μg/kg d.w. These results are slightly higher than concentrations noted in natural or non-polluted soils, but still low. These amounts of selenium could have more positive than negative effects. Aluminium and selenium concentrations were discussed concurrently with base soils parameters, such as pH, EC and granulometric fractions composition.
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Abstract

Cytological evaluation of bone marrow smears stained by May-Grünwald Giemsa method was performed. The smears came from 20 fallow deer (Dama dama) 3 days old divided into 2 groups each consisting of 10 animals. The experimental group (E) received intramuscularly selenium and vitamin E at a dose of 3.0 ml (tocopherol acetate – 50 mg, sodium selenite – 0.5 mg, solvent - 1 ml) in the 3rd day of age. The control group (C) did not receive any supplementation or placebo. For hematological analyzes blood was collected three times: on 0, 15th and 25th day of the experiment. Serum concentration of selenium and vitamin E was determined using high perfor- mance liquid chromatography and glutathione peroxidase activity (GSH-Px) by kinetic method. On the 15th day after supplementation, a statistically significant increase in the percentage of erythroblastic cell line was observed in bone marrow smears. At that time, the increase in GSH-Px activity in the E group was also observed, reaching the value of 165.3 U/gHb, which was statisti- cally significant. The percentage of proerythroblasts (8.23% in group E and 5.02% in group C) differed significantly between groups at the 25th day after supplementation. This study revealed that supplementation of selenium and vitamin E resulted in an increase in the number of erythro- cytes to an average of 13.5 (˟ 10¹²/l) in the experimental group on 25th day with a significant increase in hemoglobin to 193 g/l in the experimental group.
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Abstract

The normotensive (Wistar) and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats were examined to assess the response of the organism to selenium (Se) overdose. Moreover, the effect of zinc (Zn) and vitamin E, i.e. dietary components interacting in many biochemical processes with Se, on the Se uptake was evaluated. The control group was fed an untreated diet, and the diets of two other groups were overdosed with Se in the form of sodium selenite (9 mg/kg) and supplemented with Zn (13 mg/kg). Two experimental groups were fed a diet supplemented with Zn (13 mg/kg) and Se at an adequate level (0.009 mg/kg); a half of the animals was supplemented with vitamin E. The results showed significant differences in the Se contents between the rat strains in case of Se-overdosed groups, where in the liver and kidney tissue Se contents of SHR rats exceeded 3- and 7-fold the normotensive ones. The Se uptake was altered by the vitamin E; no effect of Zn was observed. Activities of antioxidant enzymes were determined in the animal tissues indicating different patterns according to rat strain, tissue analysed, and administered Se dose. Thus, Se overdose, for instance, via an incorrectly prepared dietary supplement, can result in serious imbalances of the biochemical status of the animals.
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Abstract

Concentrations of four trace elements, copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn) and seleni- um (Se), have thus far proven to be affected by lentiviral infections in people and rhesus monkeys. As small ruminant lentivirus (SRLV) infection is responsible for one of the most important goat diseases, caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAE), we evaluated serum and liver concentrations of Cu, Zn, Mn, Se in goats severely affected by symptomatic CAE and compared them with litera- ture reference intervals. Serum and liver samples of dairy goats euthanized due to severe clinical form of CAE were collected and screened for the concentration of Cu, Zn, Mn (54 serum sam- ples, 22 liver samples), and Se (36 serum samples, 22 liver samples) using flame atomic absorption spectrometry for Cu, Zn, Mn and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy for Se. In both serum and liver samples concentration of Zn was the highest, followed by Cu concentration, and then by Mn and Se. There was no relationship between serum and liver concentrations of trace elements. Liver concentrations of all four trace elements and serum Cu concentration fell within literature reference intervals, although liver Se concentration was mainly in the lower marginal range (between 0.4 and 1.0 mg/L). Serum Zn concentration was elevated (>1.2 mg/L) in all goats, serum Mn concentration was elevated (>0.04 mg/L) in 42 (78%) goats and serum Se concentra- tion was elevated (>1.6 mg/L) in 13 (36%) goats. Concluding, severe symptomatic CAE does not appear to be associated with the level of any of the four trace elements.
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Abstract

The study was performed on 21 H-F calves divided into 3 groups of 7 animals each. The first group was composed of calves whose mothers did not receive an injection of Se preparation. The second and third groups consisted of calves whose mothers were administered injections of Se and vitamin E in a single dose of 10 ml and 30 ml, 10 days before the expected parturition date. 24 hours after birth, blood samples were collected from all calves to determine Se, Fe and IgG concentrations and the activity of GSH-Px and GGT. The results of the study indicate that the administration of a single-dose Se supplement to cows in late pregnancy increases Se concentration in calves and promotes passive transfer of immunity from the mother to offspring.
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