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Abstract

In this paper, a new feature-extraction method is proposed to achieve robustness of speech recognition systems. This method combines the benefits of phase autocorrelation (PAC) with bark wavelet transform. PAC uses the angle to measure correlation instead of the traditional autocorrelation measure, whereas the bark wavelet transform is a special type of wavelet transform that is particularly designed for speech signals. The extracted features from this combined method are called phase autocorrelation bark wavelet transform (PACWT) features. The speech recognition performance of the PACWT features is evaluated and compared to the conventional feature extraction method mel frequency cepstrum coefficients (MFCC) using TI-Digits database under different types of noise and noise levels. This database has been divided into male and female data. The result shows that the word recognition rate using the PACWT features for noisy male data (white noise at 0 dB SNR) is 60%, whereas it is 41.35% for the MFCC features under identical conditions
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Abstract

In the last decade of the XX-th century, several academic centers have launched intensive research programs on the brain-computer interface (BCI). The current state of research allows to use certain properties of electromagnetic waves (brain activity) produced by brain neurons, measured using electroencephalographic techniques (EEG recording involves reading from electrodes attached to the scalp - the non-invasive method - or with electrodes implanted directly into the cerebral cortex - the invasive method). A BCI system reads the user's “intentions” by decoding certain features of the EEG signal. Those features are then classified and "translated" (on-line) into commands used to control a computer, prosthesis, wheelchair or other device. In this article, the authors try to show that the BCI is a typical example of a measurement and control unit.
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Abstract

An array consisting of four commercial gas sensors with target specifications for hydrocarbons, ammonia, alcohol, explosive gases has been constructed and tested. The sensors in the array operate in the dynamic mode upon the temperature modulation from 350°C to 500°C. Changes in the sensor operating temperature lead to distinct resistance responses affected by the gas type, its concentration and the humidity level. The measurements are performed upon various hydrogen (17-3000 ppm), methane (167-3000 ppm) and propane (167-3000 ppm) concentrations at relative humidity levels of 0-75%RH. The measured dynamic response signals are further processed with the Discrete Fourier Transform. Absolute values of the dc component and the first five harmonics of each sensor are analysed by a feed-forward back-propagation neural network. The ultimate aim of this research is to achieve a reliable hydrogen detection despite an interference of the humidity and residual gases.
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Abstract

Based on recent advances in non-linear analysis, the surface electromyography (sEMG) signal has been studied from the viewpoints of self-affinity and complexity. In this study, we examine usage of critical exponent analysis (CE) method, a fractal dimension (FD) estimator, to study properties of the sEMG signal and to deploy these properties to characterize different movements for gesture recognition. SEMG signals were recorded from thirty subjects with seven hand movements and eight muscle channels. Mean values and coefficient of variations of the CE from all experiments show that there are larger variations between hand movement types but there is small variation within the same type. It also shows that the CE feature related to the self-affine property for the sEMG signal extracted from different activities is in the range of 1.855~2.754. These results have also been evaluated by analysis-of-variance (p-value). Results show that the CE feature is more suitable to use as a learning parameter for a classifier compared with other representative features including root mean square, median frequency and Higuchi's method. Most p-values of the CE feature were less than 0.0001. Thus the FD that is computed by the CE method can be applied to be used as a feature for a wide variety of sEMG applications.
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Abstract

This paper presents the classification of musical instruments using Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MFCC) and Higher Order Spectral features. MFCC, cepstral, temporal, spectral, and timbral features have been widely used in the task of musical instrument classification. As music sound signal is generated using non-linear dynamics, non-linearity and non-Gaussianity of the musical instruments are important features which have not been considered in the past. In this paper, hybridisation of MFCC and Higher Order Spectral (HOS) based features have been used in the task of musical instrument classification. HOS-based features have been used to provide instrument specific information such as non-Gaussianity and non-linearity of the musical instruments. The extracted features have been presented to Counter Propagation Neural Network (CPNN) to identify the instruments and their family. For experimentation, isolated sounds of 19 musical instruments have been used from McGill University Master Sample (MUMS) sound database. The proposed features show the significant improvement in the classification accuracy of the system.
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