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Abstract

The suitability of low-cost impedance sensors for microbiological purposes and biofilm growth monitoring was evaluated. The sensors with interdigitated electrodes were fabricated in PCB and LTCC technologies. The electrodes were golden (LTCC) or gold-plated (PCB) to provide surface stability. The sensors were used for monitoring growth and degradation of the reference ATCC 15442 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain biofilm in invitro setting. During the experiment, the impedance spectra of the sensors were measured and analysed using electrical equivalent circuit (EEC) modelling. Additionally, the process of adhesion and growth of bacteria on a sensor’s surface was assessed by means of the optical and SEM microscopy. EEC and SEM microscopic analysis revealed that the gold layer on copper electrodes was not tight, making the PCB sensors susceptible to corrosion while the LTCC sensors had good surface stability. It turned out that the LTCC sensors are suitable for monitoring pseudomonal biofilm and the PCB sensors are good detectors of ongoing stages of biofilm formation.
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Abstract

Bioremediation is based on microorganisms able to use pollutants either as a source of carbon or in co-metabolism, and is a promising strategy in cleaning the environment. Using soil contaminated with petroleum products from an industrial area in Saudi Arabia (Jubail), and after enrichment with the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) naphthalene, a Methylobacterium radiotolerans strain (N7A0) was isolated that can grow in the presence of naphthalene as the sole source of carbon. M. radiotolerans is known to be resistant to gamma radiation, and this is the first documented report of a strain of this bacterium using a PAH as the sole source of carbon. The commonly reported Pseudomonas aeruginosa (strain N7B1) that biodegrades naphthalene was also identified, and gas chromatography analyses have shown that the biodegradation of naphthalene by M. radiotolerans and P. aeruginosa did follow both the salicylate and phthalate pathways.
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Abstract

In the present study a severe outbreak of hemorrhagic pneumonia (HP) in neonatal minks concomitant with Leismania infantum (L. infantum) detection is reported. The outbreak took place on a Greek mink farm and affected 1,362 mink kits, with 524 dying. Macroscopic lesions of 14 necropsied affected kits were confined to the respiratory system with dark red, consolidated lung lobes and to the small intestine with severe, acute, hemorrhagic and necrotic enteritis. Microscopic examination of lung sections revealed severe hemorrhagic pyogranulomatous pneumonia. Bacteria were obtained in pure culture from the lungs of all necropsied animals and were confirmed as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). Three out of 14 (21.4%) animals were positive for the presence of L. infantum DNA. The outbreak was attributed to the infection of minks with P. aeruginosa, possibly as a consequence of being immuno-suppressed by L. infantum. Further research is necessary, especially on the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa/L. infantum co-infection and the implications of this interaction on HP disease outcome.
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