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Number of results: 14
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Abstract

The paper presents the issue of synthetic cast iron production in the electric induction furnace exclusively on the steel scrap base. Silicon carbide and synthetic graphite were used as carburizers. The carburizers were introduced with solid charge or added on the liquid metal surface. The chemical analysis of the produced cast iron, the carburization efficiency and microstructure features were presented in the paper. It was stated that ferrosilicon can be replaced by silicon carbide during the synthetic cast iron melting process. However, due to its chemical composition (30% C and 70% Si) which causes significant silicon content in iron increase, the carbon deficit can be partly compensated by the carburizer introduction. Moreover it was shown that the best carbon and silicon assimilation rate is obtained where the silicon carbide is being introduced together with solid charge. When it is thrown onto liquid alloy surface the efficiency of the process is almost two times less and the melting process lasts dozen minutes long. The microstructure of the cast iron produced with the silicon carbide shows more bulky graphite flakes than inside the microstructure of cast iron produced on the pig iron base.
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Abstract

The present paper is a presentation of results of a study on morphology, chemical composition, material properties (HVIT, HIT, EIT), and nanoindentation elastic and plastic work for carbide precipitates in chromium cast iron containing 24% Cr. It has been found that the carbides differ in chemical composition, as well as in morphology and values characterizing their material properties. The carbides containing the most chromium which had the shape of thick and long needles were characterized with highest values of the analyzed material properties.
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Abstract

This paper presents the results of studies of high-alloyed white cast iron modified with lanthanum, titanium, and aluminium-strontium. The samples were taken from four melts of high-vanadium cast iron with constant carbon and vanadium content and near-eutectic microstructure into which the tested inoculants were introduced in an amount of 1 wt% respective of the charge weight. The study included a metallographic examinations, mechanical testing, as well as hardness and impact resistance measurements taken on the obtained alloys. Studies have shown that different additives affect both the microstructure and mechanical properties of high-vanadium cast iron.
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Abstract

Flake graphite cast iron was hot-dip coated with pure aluminium or aluminium alloys (AlSi11 and AlTi5). The study aimed at determining the influence of bath composition on the thickness, microstructure and phase composition of the coatings. The analysis was conducted by means of an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope with an EDS spectrometer. It was found that the overall thickness of a coating was greatly dependent on the chemical composition of a bath. The coatings consisted of an outer layer and an inner intermetallic layer, the latter with two zones and dispersed graphite. In all the cases considered, the zone in the inner intermetallic layer adjacent to the cast iron substrate contained the Al5Fe2 phase with small amount of silicon; the interface between this phase and the cast iron substrate differed substantially, depending on the bath composition. In the coatings produced by hot-dipping in pure aluminium the zone adjacent to the outer layer had a composition similar to that produced from an AlTi5 bath, the Al3Fe phase was identified in this zone. The Al3Fe also contained silicon but its amount was lower than that in the Al5Fe2. In the coatings produced by hot-dipping in AlSi11, the zone adjacent to the outer layer contained the Al3FeSi phase. The analysis results showed that when AlSi11 alloy was applied, the growth mode of the inner layer changed from inwards to outwards. The interface between the Al5Fe2 phase and the cast iron substrate was flat and the zone of this phase was very thin. Locally, there were deep penetrations of the Al5FeSi phase into the outer layer, and the interface between this phase and the outer layer was irregular. Immersion in an AlTi5 bath caused that the inner intermetallic layer was thicker than when pure aluminium or AlSi11 alloy baths were used; also, some porosity was observed in this layer; and finally, the interface between the inner layer and the cast iron substrate was the most irregular.
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Abstract

The paper deals with the issue of potential for improvement of resistance of wood chip fine grinders to abrasive wear by providing them with WCCoCr coating applied with the use of atmospheric plasma spraying (APS). The study focused on establishing parameters of the technological process of spraying a 250–270 μm thick coating onto surface of ductile cast iron castings used to date as grinder linings. The presented data include results of microstructure examination, chemical composition analysis, HV hardness measurements, and scratch tests for both previous and new variant of linings. The obtained scratch test results indicate that the material of the coating is characterized with definitely lower susceptibility to scratching. The scratch made on coating was 75–84 μm wide and 7.2–8.2 μm deep, while the scratch on cast iron was distinctly wider (200–220 μm) and deeper (8.5–12.8 μm). In case of cast iron, the range of variability in scratch width and depth was definitely larger. This can be explained with large difference in hardness of individual components of microstructure of cast iron and significantly larger plastic deformation of cast iron compared to the coating revealed in the course of indenter motion over surfaces of the two materials. It has been found that application of WCCoCr coating offered better resistance of lining surfaces to scratching which can be considered a rationale for undertaking in-service tests.
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Abstract

The paper presents results of Ti-addition to High Chromium Cast Iron (HCCI) on the structure and selected mechanical properties. For this study casted two sets of cylinders with dimensions ø20 mm, ø15 mm x 250 mm, for the High Chromium Cast Iron (HCCI) and with the 4% by mass Ti-addition. Melts were performed in the induction furnace crucible capacity of 15 kg. During the heats the cup with installed S type thermocouple was poured to record the cooling curves. The cylinders were subjected to the static bending strength test. Samples for the test microstructure and Rockwell hardness were cut from the cylinders. The study shows that the addition of titanium had an impact on the structure and thus the properties of High Chromium Cast Iron (HCCI). In subsequent studies, through an appropriate choice of chemical composition and proper process control, it is planned to obtain in the structure the titanium carbides TiC and chromium carbides with type (Cr, Fe)7C3.
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Abstract

Effects of charge composition on microstructure, mechanical and fatigue properties of nodular cast irons have been studied. For experiments, five melts of nodular cast iron were used – three types of unalloyed nodular cast irons (with different ratio of steel and pig iron in a charge and different additives for regulation of the chemical composition) and two types of alloyed nodular cast irons (SiMo- and SiCu- nodular cast iron). The microstructure of the specimens was evaluated according to a norm and by automatic image analysis. The mechanical properties were investigated by the tensile test, impact bending test and Brinell hardness test. The fatigue tests were carried out at sinusoidal cyclic push-pull loading at ambient temperature. The best mechanical properties were reached in the nodular cast iron alloyed by Si and Cu, what is related to its microstructure.
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Abstract

The paper presents the technology of manufacturing layered castings, consisting of grey cast iron (base part) and high-chromium stainless steel (working part/layer). The aim of researches was an attempt of integration of heat treatment of steel X46Cr13 grade with founding of grey cast iron in bimetallic system and determination of the influence of cooling rate of bimetallic system in classical sand mould with bentonite on microstructure and hardness of the working layer. The castings were manufactured using mould cavity preparation method, where steel plate was poured by grey cast iron using different pouring temperature and thickness of base part. Then, the quality of joint between cast iron and steel plate was estimated by using ultrasonic non-destructive testing. The efficiency of heat treatment process was analysed by measurement of hardness and in metallographic examination. Conducted studies showed, that self-hardening’s ability of steel X46Cr13 let obtain technologically usable layered casting characterized by hardness of working surface up to 35 HRC.
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Abstract

This article deals with the technology and principles of the laser cutting of ductile cast iron. The properties of the CO2laser beam, input parameters of the laser cutting, assist gases, the interaction of cut material and the stability of cutting process are described. The commonly used material (nodular cast iron - share of about 25% of all castings on the market) and the method of the laser cutting of that material, including the technological parameters that influence the cutting edge, are characterized. Next, the application and use of this method in mechanical engineering practice is described, focusing on fixing and renovation of mechanical components such as removing the inflow gate from castings with the desired quality of the cut, without the further using of the chip machining technology. Experimental samples from the nodular cast iron were created by using different technological parameters of laser cutting. The heat affected zone (HAZ), its width, microstructure and roughness parameter Pt was monitored on the experimental samples (of thickness t = 13 mm). The technological parameters that were varied during the experiments included the type of assist gases (N2and O2), to be more specific the ratio of gases, and the cutting speed, which ranged from 1.6 m/min to 0.32 m/min. Both parameters were changed until the desired properties were achieved.
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Abstract

The present paper describe the issue of tool materials wear in a high temperature conditions. The investigations were performed at the cast steel tool material at the tribological contact to the structural steel. The investigations aim was to determine the role of microstructure in a tribological properties between the structural steel and tool material. The results of such investigation could be referenced to the industry conditions and could answer about the problems of tool materials wear. The observations of the wear mechanisms were referred to the microstructure of the mill rolls. The laboratory tests ware aimed at evaluating the thermal treatment modification effect on the cast steels properties. A significant role of the morphology of ledeburitic cementite and secondary cementite on the tribological properties was exhibited. The investigations assumed the presence of an austenitic matrix with primary and secondary cementite. Influence of varying morphology carbides was described. in the cast steel microstructure. The investigation results make possible to point to a direction of carbide morphology change with the purpose of obtaining the assumed properties of hot operation tools.
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Abstract

In the family of iron-based alloys, ductile iron enjoys the highest rate of development, finding application in various industries. Ductile iron or the cast iron with spheroidal graphite can be manufactured by various methods. One of them is the Inmold spheroidization process characterized by different technological solutions, developed mainly to increase the process efficiency. So far, however, none of the solutions has been based on the use of a reactor made outside the casting mould cavity. The method of spheroidization inside the casting mould using a reaction chamber developed at the Foundry Research Institute is an innovative way of cast iron treatment. The innovative character of this method consists in the use of properly designed and manufactured reactor placed in the casting mould cavity. Owing to this solution, the Inmold process can be carried out in moulds with both horizontal and vertical parting plane. The study presents the results of examinations of the microstructure of graphite precipitates and metal matrix of castings after spheroidization carried out by the Inmold process using a reactor and mould with vertical parting plane. Special pattern assembly was made for the tests to reproduce plates with wall thicknesses of 3; 5; 7; 10; 20 and 30 mm. The content of residual magnesium was determined for all tested castings, while for castings of plates with a wall thickness equal to or larger than 10 mm, testing of mechanical properties was additionally performed.
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Abstract

An intentional change in material properties is an important condition for castings production. It is one way how to meet the casting requirements of how to adapt the material properties to the operating conditions. Centrifugally cast rolls are multi-layer rollers, castings. The working layer of the barrel is called the "shell" and the body of the roll and the necks rolls are called "core". The article deals with the influence of the properties of the core iron. Earlier laboratory experiments were primary analysed for metallographic analysis and mechanical properties. These data were compared back to the experiments. The results of these laboratory working were later applied in the operating conditions of the roll foundry Vítkovitcké slévárny, spol. s r.o. The spun cast roll produced with the applied metallurgical processing change was supplied to the hot strip mill. There were monitored the positive effect of the change of the metallurgical process of the production of the core iron on the useful properties of the centrifugally cast roll. The experiment was done in order to increase the mechanical properties of ductile pearlite ductile iron. The copper in these core iron material increases the hardness and strength primarily.
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Abstract

High-vanadium cast iron is the white cast iron in which the regular fibrous γ + VC eutectic with the volume fraction of vanadium carbide amounting to about 20% crystallises. This paper presents the results of studies on high-vanadium cast iron subjected to the inoculation treatment with magnesium master alloy. The aim of this operation is to change the morphology of the crystallising VC carbides from the fibrous shape into a spheroidal one. The study also examines the effect of the amount of the introduced inoculant on changes in the morphology of the crystallising VC carbides. To achieve the goals once set, metallographic studies were performed on high-vanadium cast iron of eutectic composition in base state and after the introduction of a variable content of the inoculant. The introduction of magnesium-based master alloy resulted in the expected changes of microstructure. The most beneficial effect was obtained with the introduction of 1.5% of magnesium master alloy, since nearly half of the crystallised vanadium carbides have acquired a spheroidal shape.
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Abstract

Effects of additions of 0.00064, 0.001 and 0.0042 wt.% Bi on the graphite structure in the section thicknesses of 3, 12, 25, 38, 50, 75 and 100 mm of spheroidal graphite cast iron castings containing 2.11 wt.% Si and rare earth (RE) elements (Ce + La + Nd + Pr + Sm + Gd) in the range from 0.00297 to 0.00337 wt.% were analyzed in this paper. Addition of Bi was not necessary for obtaining high nodule count and nodularity higher than 80% in section thicknesses of 3, 12 and 25 mm. RE elements showed a beneficial effect on the nodule count and nodularity in these sections. Nodularity was below 80% in section thicknesses of 38, 50, 75 and 100 mm when Bi was not added. Detrimental effect of RE elements on graphite morphology in these sections was neutralized by adequate addition of Bi. Addition of 0.001 wt.% Bi (ratio of RE/Bi = 3.27) was enough to achieve nodularity above 80% in the section thickness of 38 mm. Nodularity was increased above 80% in section thicknesses of 50, 75 and 100 mm by addition of 0.0042 wt.% Bi (ratio of RE/Bi = 0.78). At the same time, Bi significantly increased the nodule count. Nodularity above 80% and the high nodule count in the section thicknesses of 75 and 100 mm were also achieved by using an external metallic chill in the mold. In this case, addition of Bi was not required.
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