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Abstract

The Multi-Tone (MT) signal with uniform amplitudes can be used for DAC testing. This paper shows an easier way to generate a MT signal using several impulse signals. The article also analyzes qualities of methods for testing the dynamic parameters of Digital to Analog Converters using an impulse signal. The MT, Damped Sine Wave (DSW) and Sinx/x (SINC) signals will be used as the source for these tests. The Effective Number of Bits (ENOB) and Signal to noise and distortion (SINAD) are evaluated in the frequency domain and they are modified using the Crest Factor (CF) correction and compared with the standard results of the Sine Wave FFT test. The first advantage of the test using an impulse signal is that you need fewer input parameters to create the band signal for testing the DAC. The second one is to reduce the testing time using a band signal in comparison with multiple tests using a single sine wave.
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Abstract

This document analyses qualities of methods used for testing dynamical parameters of Digital-to-Analog Converters (DAC) using a multi-frequency signal. As the source for these signals, Amplitude Modulated (AM) and Frequency Modulated (FM) signals are used. These signals are often used in radio engineering. Results of the tests, like Effective Number of Bits (ENOB), Signal-to-Noise and Distortion (SINAD), are evaluated in the frequency domain and they are compared with standard results of Sine Wave FFT test methods. The aim of this research is firstly to test whether it is possible to test a DAC using modulated signals, secondly to reduce testing time, while estimating band performance of DAC.
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Abstract

Many studies have been developed aiming to improve digital filters realizations, recurring to intricate structures and analyzing probabilistically the error's behavior. The work presented in this paper analyzes the feasibility of fixed-point implementation of classical infinite impulse response notch filters: Butterworth, Chebyshev I and II, and elliptic. To scrutinize the deformations suffered for distinct design specifications, it is assessed: the effect of the quality factor and normalized cut-off frequency, in the number of significant bits necessary to represent the filter's coefficients. The implications brought to FPGA implementation are also verified. The work focuses especially on the implementation of power line notch filters used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio in biomedical signals. The results obtained, when quantizing the digital notch filters, show that by applying second-order sections decomposition, low-order digital filters may be designed using only part of double precision capabilities. High-order notch filters with harsh design constraints are implementable using double precision, but only in second-order sections. Thus, it is revealed that to optimize computation time in real-time applications, an optimal digital notch filter implementation platform should have variable arithmetic precision. Considering these implementation constraints, utmost operation performance is finally estimated when implementing digital notch filters in Xilinx Virtex-5 field-programmable gate arrays. The influence of several design specifications, e.g. type, and order, in the filter's behavior was evaluated, namely in regard to order, type, input and coefficient number of bits, quality factor and cut-off frequency. Finally the implications and potential applications of such results are discussed.
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Abstract

This paper considers a method for indirect measuring the vertical displacement of wheels resulting from the road profile, using an inverse parametric data-driven model. Wheel movement is required in variable damping suspension systems, which use an onboard electronic control system that improves ride quality and vehicle handling in typical maneuvres. This paper presents a feasibility study of such an approach which was performed in laboratory conditions. Experimental validation tests were conducted on a setup consisting of a servo-hydraulic test rig equipped with displacement, force and acceleration transducers and a data-acquisition system. The fidelity and adequacy of various parametric SISO model structures were evaluated in the time domain based on correlation coefficient, FPE and AIC criteria. The experimental test results showed that inverse models provide accuracy of inversion, ranging from more than 70% for the ARX model structure to over 90% for the OE model structure.
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Abstract

This overview paper presents and compares different methods traditionally used for estimating damped sinusoid parameters. Firstly, direct nonlinear least squares fitting the signal model in the time and frequency domains are described. Next, possible applications of the Hilbert transform for signal demodulation are presented. Then, a wide range of autoregressive modelling methods, valid for damped sinusoids, are discussed, in which frequency and damping are estimated from calculated signal linear self-prediction coefficients. These methods aim at solving, directly or using least squares, a matrix linear equation in which signal or its autocorrelation function samples are used. The Prony, Steiglitz-McBride, Kumaresan-Tufts, Total Least Squares, Matrix Pencil, Yule-Walker and Pisarenko methods are taken into account. Finally, the interpolated discrete Fourier transform is presented with examples of Bertocco, Yoshida, and Agrež algorithms. The Matlab codes of all the discussed methods are given. The second part of the paper presents simulation results, compared with the Cramér-Rao lower bound and commented. All tested methods are compared with respect to their accuracy (systematic errors), noise robustness, required signal length, and computational complexity.
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