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Abstract

This paper describes the prototype version of a mobile application supporting independent movement of the blind. Its objective is to improve the quality of life of visually impaired people, providing them with navigational assistance in urban areas. The authors present the most important modules of the application. The module for precise positioning using DGPS data from the ASG-EUPOS network as well as enhancements of positioning in urban areas, based on the fusion with other types of data sources, are presented. The devices, tools and software for the acquisition and maintenance of dedicated spatial data are also described. The module responsible for navigation with a focus on an algorithms' quality and complexity, as well as the user interface dedicated for the blind are discussed. The system's main advantages over existing solutions are emphasized, current results are described, and plans for future work briefly outlined.
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Abstract

The graphical user interface (GUI) and the functionality of various global map services in the context of responsive web design were compared in the article. The analysis included: the number and arrangement of buttons on the start screen, available map layers, waypoints and means of transport for searched routes on four screens of various sizes: the desktop computer, laptop, tablet, and smartphone screen. Having compared the interface and the functionality of eight global map services (Baidu Maps, Google Maps, HereWeGo, Bing Maps, Open Street Map, Map Quest, 2Gis, Yandex Maps), authors draw conclusions concerning responsive web design. Despite the fact that specific map services differ, there are some common features making a good example of the adaptation of the graphical user interface to the device on which the map is presented. Global map services, regardless of the display size, use the same interactive tools that are graphically similar. Among those graphic similarities, one can distinguish two or three graphical styles representing a single function. Two versions of the interface can be observed – the desktop and mobile type. Adaptation to devices such as laptops or tablets assumes that only the screen decreases but the interface and the functionality remains relatively unchanged. Real responsiveness occurs only when service is displayed on a smartphone display.
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Abstract

This paper presents the results of Pilot Assisting Module research performed on two light aircraft flight simulators developed in parallel at Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic, and Rzeszow University of Technology, Poland. The first simulator was designed as an open platform for the verification and validation of the advanced pilot/aircraft interface systems and inherited its appearance from the cockpit section of the Evektor SportStar. The second flight simulator, the XM-15, has been built around the cockpit of a unique agriculture jet Belfegor. It introduced a system architecture that supports scientific simulations of various aircraft types and configurations, making it suitable for conceptual testing of Pilot Assisting Module. The XM-15 was initially designed to support research on advanced flight control systems, but due to its continuing modernization it evolved into a hardware-in-the-loop test-bed for electromechanical actuators and autopilot CAN based controller blocks. Pilot-in-the-loop experiments of proposed Pilot Assisting Module revealed favorable operational scenarios, under which the proposed system reduces the cockpit workload during single pilot operations.
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