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Number of results: 10
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Abstract

Stealth in military sonars applications may be ensured through the use of low power signals making them difficult to intercept by the enemy. In recent years, silent sonar design has been investigated by the Department of Marine Electronic Systems of the Gdansk University of Technology. This article provides an analysis of how an intercept sonar operated by the enemy can detect silent sonar signals. To that end a theoretical intercept sonar model was developed with formulas that can numerically determine the intercept ranges of silent sonar sounding signals. This was tested for a variety of applications and water salinities. Because they are also presented in charts, the results can be used to compare the intercept ranges of silent sonar and traditional pulse sonar.
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Abstract

Noise-like binary sequences combined with signals with linear frequency modulation might be successfully used to increase the reliability of the recognition of both probe and communication signals in the presence of natural and artificial interference. To identify such formed sequences the usage of the two-step matched filtering was suggested and the probabilistic model of the recognition of noise-like code sequences transferred by LFM signals was developed.
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Abstract

In many physical experiments, linear frequency modulated (LFM) signals are widely used to probe objects in different environments, from outer-space to underwater. These signals allow a significant improvement in measurement resolution, even when the observation distance is great. For example, using LFM probe signals in underwater investigations enables discovery of even small objects covered by bottom sediments. Recognition of LFM (chirp) signals depends on their compression based on matched filtering. This work presents two simple solutions to improve the resolution of the short chirp signals recognition. These methods are effective only if synchronization between the signal and matched filter (MF) is obtained. This work describes both the aforementioned methods and a method of minimizing the effects of the lack of synchronization. The proposed matched filtering method, with the use of n parallel MFs and other techniques, allows only one sample to be obtained in the main lobe and to accurately locate its position in the appropriate sampling period Ts with accuracy Ts/n. These approaches are appropriate for use in probe signal processing.
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Abstract

The paper presents and discusses a method of azimuth determination of ultrasonic echo arrival in air. The basis of the presented approach is the assumption that the received signal is a narrowband one. In this way, the direction of the signal arrival can be determined based on its phase shift using two receivers. When the distance between the receivers exceeds half of the wavelength of the received signal, a problem of ambiguity in determining the angle of arrival arises. To solve this, a method using multiple pairs of receivers was used. Its robustness and temperature dependence is analysed. The most important advantages of the presented approach are simplified computations and low hardware requirements. Experimental data made it possible to show that for strong echoes, the accuracy is higher than 0.5X. In the case of weak echos, it is reduced to about 2X. Because the method is based on phase shift measurement, the ultrasonic sonar that uses this method can be compact in size. Moreover, owing to the theoretical analysis, certain properties of the mutual location of the receivers were found and formally proved. They are crucial for determining proper receivers’ inter-distances.
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Abstract

Stealth is a frequent requirement in military applications and involves the use of devices whose signals are difficult to intercept or identify by the enemy. The silent sonar concept was studied and developed at the Department of Marine Electronic Systems of the Gdansk University of Technology. The work included a detailed theoretical analysis, computer simulations and some experimental research. The results of the theoretical analysis and computer simulation suggested that target detection and positioning accuracy deteriorate as the speed of the target increases, a consequence of the Doppler effect. As a result, more research and measurements had to be conducted to verify the initial findings. To ensure that the results can be compared with those from the experimental silent sonar model, the target's actual position and speed had to be precisely controlled. The article presents the measurement results of a silent sonar model looking at its detection, range resolution and problems of incorrect positioning of moving targets as a consequence of the Doppler effect. The results were compared with those from the theoretical studies and computer simulations.
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Abstract

Gas bubbles in the ocean are produced by breaking waves, rainfall, methane seeps, exsolution, and a range of biological processes including decomposition, photosynthesis, respiration and digestion. However one biological process that produces particularly dense clouds of large bubbles, is bubble netting. This is practiced by several species of cetacean. Given their propensity to use acoustics, and the powerful acoustical attenuation and scattering that bubbles can cause, the relationship between sound and bub-ble nets is intriguing. It has been postulated that humpback whales produce ‘walls of sound’ at audio frequencies in their bubble nets, trapping prey. Dolphins, on the other hand, use high frequency acous-tics for echolocation. This begs the question of whether, in producing bubble nets, they are generating echolocation clutter that potentially helps prey avoid detection (as their bubble nets would do with man-made sonar), or whether they have developed sonar techniques to detect prey within such bubble nets and distinguish it from clutter. Possible sonar schemes that could detect targets in bubble clouds are proposed, and shown to work both in the laboratory and at sea. Following this, similar radar schemes are proposed for the detection of buried explosives and catastrophe victims, and successful laboratory tests are undertaken.
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Abstract

The article presents methods that help in the elimination of mutual clutter as well as the consequences of two FM sounding signal sonars operating in the same body of water and frequency band. An in-depth analysis of mutual clutter was carried out. The effects of sounding signal differentiation were determined, as was the Doppler effect on mutual clutter suppression. One of the methods analysed is of particular interest in a situation in which collaborating sonars are operating in opposite frequency modulation directions. This method is effective for both linear and hyperbolic frequency modulations. A formula was derived, identifying exactly how much quantities of clutter may be lessened. The work included comprehensive computer simulations and measurements as well as tests in real-life conditions.
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Abstract

In this paper, a new Multi-Layer Perceptron Neural Network (MLP NN) classifier is proposed for classifying sonar targets and non-targets from the acoustic backscattered signals. Besides the capabilities of MLP NNs, it uses Back Propagation (BP) and Gradient Descent (GD) for training; therefore, MLP NNs face with not only impertinent classification accuracy but also getting stuck in local minima as well as lowconvergence speed. To lift defections, this study uses Adaptive Best Mass Gravitational Search Algorithm (ABGSA) to train MLP NN. This algorithm develops marginal disadvantage of the GSA using the bestcollected masses within iterations and expediting exploitation phase. To test the proposed classifier, this algorithm along with the GSA, GD, GA, PSO and compound method (PSOGSA) via three datasets in various dimensions will be assessed. Assessed metrics include convergence speed, fail probability in local minimum and classification accuracy. Finally, as a practical application assumed network classifies sonar dataset. This dataset consists of the backscattered echoes from six different objects: four targets and two non-targets. Results indicate that the new classifier proposes better output in terms of aforementioned criteria than whole proposed benchmarks.
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Abstract

The study aimed to apply the protection from damage to engineering facilities located near a planned underwater aggregate extraction. The analysis was conducted in compliance with mining regulations and expert opinions. The study also aimed to assess the precision and correctness of the extraction, due to economic aspects. To reach the goals, in-situ research of the mining area was conducted, with the help of an advanced bathymetric device, based on the USV methodology. The instrument – named by the author as Smart-Sonar-Boat – was especially designed for underwater surveys in open-pit aggregate mines. The study analyzed the “Dwory” open-pit mine, located in southern Poland in the city of Oświęcim. The bathymetric results obtained contributed to improving the observation of changes in the bottom during the extraction. The applied USV method allowed for conducting the reliable evaluation of the mining work.
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Abstract

The secretiveness of sonar operation can be achieved by using continuous frequency-modulated sounding signals with reduced power and significantly prolonged repeat time. The application of matched filtration in the sonar receiver provides optimal conditions for detection against the background of white noise and reverberation, and a very good resolution of distance measurements of motionless targets. The article shows that target movement causes large range measurement errors when linear and hyperbolic frequency modulations are used. The formulas for the calculation of these errors are given. It is shown that for signals with linear frequency modulation the range resolution and detection conditions deteriorate. The use of hyperbolic frequency modulation largely eliminates these adverse effects.
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