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Abstract

In the present study a severe outbreak of hemorrhagic pneumonia (HP) in neonatal minks concomitant with Leismania infantum (L. infantum) detection is reported. The outbreak took place on a Greek mink farm and affected 1,362 mink kits, with 524 dying. Macroscopic lesions of 14 necropsied affected kits were confined to the respiratory system with dark red, consolidated lung lobes and to the small intestine with severe, acute, hemorrhagic and necrotic enteritis. Microscopic examination of lung sections revealed severe hemorrhagic pyogranulomatous pneumonia. Bacteria were obtained in pure culture from the lungs of all necropsied animals and were confirmed as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). Three out of 14 (21.4%) animals were positive for the presence of L. infantum DNA. The outbreak was attributed to the infection of minks with P. aeruginosa, possibly as a consequence of being immuno-suppressed by L. infantum. Further research is necessary, especially on the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa/L. infantum co-infection and the implications of this interaction on HP disease outcome.
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Abstract

Self-biting disease occurs in most farmed fur animals in the world. The mechanism and rapid detection method of this disease has not been reported. We applied bulked sergeant analysis (BSA) in combination with RAPD method to analyze a molecular genetic marker linked with self-biting trait in mink group. The molecular marker was converted into SCAR and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) marker for rapid detection of this disease. A single RAPD marker A10 amplified a specific band of 1000bp in self-biting minks. The sequences of the bands exhibited 73% similarity to the Canis Brucella. SCAR and LAMP marker were designed for the specific fragment of RAPD marker A10 and validated in 30 self-biting minks and 30 healthy minks. c2 test showed difference (p<0.05) with SCAR and significant difference (p<0.01) with LAMP in the detection rate between the two groups, but LAMP method was more accurate than SCAR method. This indicated that LAMP can be used as a positive marker to detect self-biting disease in minks.
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