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Number of results: 10
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Abstract

Magnetic properties of silicon iron electrical steel are determined by using standardized measurement setups and distinct excitation parameters. Characteristic values for magnetic loss and magnetization are used to select the most appropriate material for its application. This approach is not sufficient, because of the complex material behavior inside electrical machines, which can result in possible discrepancies between estimated and actual machine behavior. The materials’ anisotropy can be one of the problems why simulation and measurement are not in good accordance.With the help of a rotational single sheet tester, the magnetic material can be tested under application relevant field distribution. Thereby, additional effects of hysteresis and anisotropy can be characterized for detailed modelling and simulation.
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Abstract

By simulating the actual working conditions of a cable, the temperature variation rule of different measuring points under different load currents was analyzed. On this basis, a three-dimensional finite element model (FEM) was established, and the difference and influence factors between the simulation temperature and the experimental measured value were discussed, then the influence of thermal conductivity on the operating temperature of the conductor layer was studied. Finally, combined with the steady-state thermal conductivity model and the experimental measured data, the relation between thermal conductivity and load current was obtained.
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Abstract

The paper presents a numerical model of the novel design of the axial magnetic bearing with six cylindrical poles. The motivation behind this idea was to eliminate vibrations in rotating machinery due to the axial load. Common conception of such a bearing provides a single component of the electromagnetic force, which is not enough to reduce transverse and lateral vibrations of the armature. The proposed design allows for avoiding wobbling of the disc with the use of a few axial force components that are able to actively compensate the axial load and stabilise the disc in a balanced position. Before a real device is manufactured, a virtual prototype should be prepared. The accurate numerical model will provide essential knowledge about the performance of the axial magnetic bearing.
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Abstract

The present paper addresses the analysis of structural vibration transmission in the presence of structural joints. The problem is tackled from a numerical point of view, analyzing some scenarios by using finite element models. The numerical results obtained making use of this process are then compared with those evaluated using the EN 12354 standard vibration reduction index concept. It is shown that, even for the simplest cases, the behavior of a structural joint is complex and evidences the frequency dependence. Comparison with results obtained by empirical formulas reveals that those of the standards cannot accurately reproduce the expected behavior, and thus indicate that alternative complementary calculation procedures are required. A simple methodology to estimate the difference between numerical and standard predictions is here proposed allowing the calculation of an adaptation term that makes both approaches converge. This term was found to be solution-dependent, and thus should be evaluated for each structure.
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Abstract

Experimental design and computational model for predicting debonding initiation and propagation are of interest of scientists and engineers. The design and model are expected to explain the phenomenon for a wide range of loading rates. In this work, a method to measure and quantify debonding strength at various loading rates is proposed. The method is experimentally verified using data obtained from a static test and a pulse-type dynamic test. The proposed method involves the cohesive zone model, which can uniquely be characterized with a few parameters. Since those parameters are difficult to be measured directly, indirect inference is deployed where the parameters are inferred by minimizing discrepancy of mechanical response of a numerical model and that of the experiments. The main finding suggests that the design is easy to be used for the debonding characterization and the numerical model can accurately predict the debonding for the both loading cases. The cohesive strength of the stress-wave case is significantly higher than that of the static case; meanwhile, the cohesive energy is twice larger.
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Abstract

Percutaneous RF ablation is one of alternative treatment for non-surgical liver tumors. Ablative changes in hepatic tissue can be successfully estimated using the finite element method. The authors created a 3D model of a multi-tine applicator immersed in liver tissue, and then determined the optimal values of voltage applied to such an RF electrode, which do not exceed the therapeutic temperature range valid during thermal ablation procedure. Importantly, the simulations were carried out for the RF electric probes with 2 to 5 evenly spaced arms. Additionally, the thermal damage of hepatic tissue for multi-armed applicators working at pre-defined limit values of voltages was established based on the Arrhenius model.
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Abstract

In order to enhance the acoustical performance of a traditional straight-path automobile muffler, a multi-chamber muffler having reverse paths is presented. Here, the muffler is composed of two internally parallel/extended tubes and one internally extended outlet. In addition, to prevent noise transmission from the muffler’s casing, the muffler’s shell is also lined with sound absorbing material. Because the geometry of an automotive muffler is complicated, using an analytic method to predict a muffler’s acoustical performance is difficult; therefore, COMSOL, a finite element analysis software, is adopted to estimate the automotive muffler’s sound transmission loss. However, optimizing the shape of a complicated muffler using an optimizer linked to the Finite Element Method (FEM) is time-consuming. Therefore, in order to facilitate the muffler’s optimization, a simplified mathematical model used as an objective function (or fitness function) during the optimization process is presented. Here, the objective function can be established by using Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) in conjunction with the muffler’s design parameters and related TLs (simulated by FEM). With this, the muffler’s optimization can proceed by linking the objective function to an optimizer, a Genetic Algorithm (GA). Consequently, the discharged muffler which is optimally shaped will improve the automotive exhaust noise.
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Abstract

Beam-to-column end-plate joints can be classified as rigid (fully restrained), semi-rigid (partiallyrestrained) or pinned, depending on their type, configuration and the connector arrangement. Fullyrestrained joints are needed for rigid frames in which there is assumed that the frame joints havesufficient rigidity to maintain – under the service state – the angles between the intersecting mem-bers, ensuring the full moment transfer. In contrast in semi-continuous frames, partially restrainedjoints are characterized by relative rotations occurring between the intersecting members so thatthe bending moment can only be transferred partially. In recent years, the idea of using partiallyrestrained, unstiffened joints in building structures has gained momentum since this idea appearsto be more practical and economical. Semi-continuous frames can resist actions by the bendingmoment transfer in partially restrained joints, allowing in the same time for a certain degree ofrotation that enhances the overall ductile performance of these structures. One of the effective waysthat affects ductility of end-plate beam-to-column joints is to use thinner end-plates than those usednowadays in practical applications. In the current study, a certain class of steel-concrete compositejoints is examined in which the thickness of end-plates is to be equivalent to approximately 40-60% of the bolt diameter used in all the composite joints investigated in the considered joint class. Thispaper is an extension of the authors’ earlier investigation on numerical modelling of the behaviourof steel frame joints. The aim of current investigations is to develop as simple as possible andyet reliable three-dimensional (3D) FE model of the composite joint behaviour that is capable ofcapturing the important factors controlling the performance of steel-concrete end-plate joints inwhich the end-plate thickness is chosen to be lesser than that used nowadays in conventional jointdetailing. A 3D FE model constructed for composite joints of the considered joint class is reportedin this paper and numerical simulations using the ABAQUS computer code are validated againstexperimental investigations conducted at the Warsaw University of Technology. Comparison betwe-en the nonlinear FE analysis and full scale experimental results of the considered class of compositejoints is presented which conclusively allows for the accuracy assessment of the modelling tech-nique developed. Comparison between the FE results and test data shows a reasonable agreementbetween the numerical FE model developed and physical model of experimentally examined jointspecimens. Finally, practical conclusions for engineering applications are drawn.
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Abstract

The transient thermal model of the permanent magnet linear actuator (PMLA) has been considered. The characteristics of heating have been calculated including the main subdomains of the actuator. The carcasses from various materials have also been considered. The calculations have been verified experimentally and a good conformity was obtained.
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Abstract

The most important task in tests of resistance of aircraft structures to the terorist threats is to determine the vulnerability of thin-walled structures to the blast wave load. For obvious reasons, full-scale experimental investigations are carried out exceptionally. In such cases, numerical simulations are very important. They make it possible to tune model parameters, yielding proper correlation with experimental data. Basing on preliminary numerical analyses - experiment can be planned properly. The paper presents some results of dynamic simulations of finite element (FE) models of a medium-size aircraft fuselage. Modeling of C4 detonation is also discussed. Characteristics of the materials used in FE calculations were obtained experimentally. The paper describes also the investigation of sensitivity of results of an explicit dynamic study to FE model parameters in a typical fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problem (detonation of a C4 explosive charge). Three cases of extent of the Eulerian mesh (the domain which contains air and a charge) were examined. Studies have shown very strong sensitivity of the results to chosen numerical models of materials, formulations of elements, assumed parameters etc. Studies confirm very strong necessity of the correlation of analysis results with experimental data. Without such a correlation, it is difficult to talk about the validation of results obtained from "explicit" codes.
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