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Abstract

The cometabolic biodegradation of 4-Chlorophenol (4-CP) by the Stenotrophomonas maltophilia KB2 strain in the presence of phenol (P) was studied. In order to determine the kinetics of biodegradation of both substrates, present alone and in cometabolic systems, a series of tests was carried out in a batch reactor changing, in a wide range, the initial concentration of both substrates. The growth of the tested strain on phenol alone was described by Haldane kinetic model (mm = 0:9 1/h, Ksg = 48:97 gg/m3, KIg = 256:12 gg/m3, Yxg = 0:5715). The rate of 4-CP transformation by resting cells of KB2 strain was also described by Haldane equation and the estimated parameters of the model were: kc = 0:229 gc=gxh, Ksc = 0:696 gc=m3, KIc = 43:82 gc=m3. Cometabolic degradation of 4-CP in the presence of phenol was investigated for a wide range of initial 4-CP and phenol concentrations (22–66 gc/m3 and 67–280 gg/m3 respectively). The experimental database was exploited to verify the two kinetic models: CIModel taking only the competitive inhibition into consideration and a more universal CNIModel considering both competitive and non-competitive inhibition. CNIModel approximated experimental data better than CIModel.
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Abstract

High intake of over-the-counter, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, has resulted in their presence in wastewaters and surface waters. The potentially harmful effect of ibuprofen present in the waters has led to a search for new methods of drugs’ removal from the environment. One of the most important technological and economical solutions comprises microbiological degradation of these resistant pollutants. Searching for new strains able to degrade ibuprofen could be one of the answers for increasing the detection of pharmaceuticals in the waters. In this study, the ability of bacterial strain Bacillus thuringiensis B1(2015b) to remove ibuprofen is described. Bacteria were cultured in both monosubstrate and cometabolic systems with 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 mg L-1 ibuprofen and 1 g L-1 glucose as a carbon source. Bacillus thuringiensis B1(2015b) removed ibuprofen up to 9 mg L-1 in 232 hours in the monosubstrate culture, whereas in the cometabolic culture the removal of the drug was over 6 times faster. That is why the examined strain could be used to enhance the bioremediation of ibuprofen.
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