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Abstract

It is possible to enhance acoustic isolation of the device from the environment by appropriately controlling vibration of a device casing. Sound insulation efficiency of this technique for a rigid casing was confirmed by the authors in previous publications. In this paper, a light-weight casing is investigated, where vibrational couplings between walls are much greater due to lack of a rigid frame. A laboratory setup is described in details. The influence of the cross-paths on successful global noise reduction is considered. Multiple vibration actuators are installed on each of the casing walls. An adaptive control strategy based on the Least Mean Square (LMS) algorithm is used to update control filter parameters. Obtained results are reported, discussed, and conclusions for future research are drawn.
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Abstract

The active noise-reducing casing developed and promoted by the authors in recent publications have multiple advantages over other active noise control methods. When compared to classical solutions, it allows for obtaining global reduction of noise generated by a device enclosed in the casing. Moreover, the system does not require loudspeakers, and much smaller actuators attached to the casing walls are used instead. In turn, when compared to passive casings, the walls can be made thinner, lighter and with much better thermal transfer than sound-absorbing materials. For active noise control a feedforward structure is usually used. However, it requires an in-advance reference signal, which can be difficult to be acquired for some applications. Fortunately, usually the dominant noise components are due to rotational operations of the enclosed device parts, and thus they are tonal and multitonal. Therefore, it can be adequately predicted and the Internal Model Control structure can be used to benefit from algorithms well developed for feedforward systems. The authors have already tested that approach for a rigid casing, where interaction of the walls was significantly reduced. In this paper the idea is further explored and applied for a light-weight casing, more frequently met in practice, where each vibrating wall of the casing influences all the other walls. The system is verified in laboratory experiments.
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Abstract

Vibrating plates can be used in Active Noise Control (ANC) applications as active barriers or as secondary sources replacing classical loudspeakers. The system with vibrating plates, especially when nonlinear MFC actuators are used, is nonlinear. The nonlinearity in the system reduces performance of classical feedforward ANC with linear control filters systems, because they cannot cope with harmonics generated by the nonlinearity. The performance of the ANC system can be improved by using nonlinear control filters, such as Artificial Neural Networks or Volterra filters. However, when multiple actuators are mounted on a single plate, which is a common practice to provide effective control of more vibration modes, each actuator should be driven by a dedicated nonlinear control filter. This significantly increases computational complexity of the control algorithm, because adaptation of nonlinear control filters is much more computationally demanding than adaptation of linear FIR filters. This paper presents an ANC system with multiple actuators, which are driven with a single nonlinear filter. To avoid destructive interference of vibrations generated by different actuators the control signal is filtered by appropriate separate linear filters. The control system is experimentally verified and obtained results are reported.
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Abstract

Vibrating plates have been recently used for a number of active noise control applications. They are resistant to difficult environmental conditions including dust, humidity, and even precipitation. However, their properties significantly depend on temperature. The plate temperature changes, caused by ambient temperature changes or plate heating due to internal friction, result in varying response of the plate, and may make it significantly different than response of a fixed model. Such mismatch may deteriorate performance of an active noise control system or even lead to divergence of a model-based adaptation algorithm. In this paper effects of vibrating plate temperature variation on a feedforward adaptive active noise reduction system with the multichannel Filtered-reference LMS algorithm are examined. For that purpose, a thin aluminum plate is excited with multiple Macro-Fiber Composite actuators. The plate temperature is forced by a set of Peltier cells, what allows for both cooling and heating the plate. The noise is generated at one side of the plate, and a major part of it is transmitted through the plate. The goal of the control system is to reduce sound pressure level at a specified area on the other side of the plate. To guarantee successful operation of the control system in face of plate temperature variation, a gain-scheduling scheme is proposed to support the Filtered-reference LMS algorithm.
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Abstract

In this paper an active multimodal beam vibration reduction via one actuator is considered. The optimal actuator distribution is analyzed with two methods: an exact mathematical principles and the LQ problem idea. It turned out that the same mathematical expressions are derived. Thus, these methods are equivalent.
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Abstract

Active Noise Control (ANC) of noise transmitted through a vibrating plate causes many problems not observed in classical ANC using loudspeakers. They are mainly due to vibrations of a not ideally clamped plate and use of nonlinear actuators, like MFC patches. In case of noise transmission though a plate, nonlinerities exist in both primary and secondary paths. Existence of nonlinerities in the system may degrade performance of a linear feedforward control system usually used for ANC. The performance degradation is especially visible for simple deterministic noise, such as tonal noise, where very high reduction is expected. Linear feedforward systems in such cases are unable to cope with higher harmonics generated by the nonlinearities. Moreover, nonlinearities, if not properly tackled with, may cause divergence of an adaptive control system. In this paper a feedforward ANC system reducing sound transmitted through a vibrating plate is presented. The ANC system uses nonlinear control filters to suppress negative effects of nonlinearies in the system. Filtered-error LMS algorithm, found more suitable than usually used Filtered-reference LMS algorithm, is employed for updating parameters of the nonlinear filters. The control system is experimentally verified and obtained results are discussed.
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Abstract

Successful implementation of an active vibration control system is strictly correlated to the exact knowledge of the dynamic behavior of the system, of the excitation level and spectra and of the sensor and actuator’s specification. Only the correct management of these aspects may guarantee the correct choice of the control strategy and the relative performance. Within this paper, some preliminary activities aimed at the creation of a structurally simple, cheap and easily replaceable active control systems for metal panels are discussed. The final future aim is to control and to reduce noise, produced by vibrations of metal panels of the body of a car. The paper is focused on two points. The first one is the realization of an electronic circuit for Synchronized Shunted Switch Architecture (SSSA) with the right dimensioning of the components to control the proposed test article, represented by a rectangular aluminum plate. The second one is a preliminary experimental study on the test article, in controlled laboratory conditions, to compare performances of two possible control approach: SSSA and a feed-forward control approach. This comparison would contribute to the future choice of the most suitable control architecture for the specific attenuation of structure-born noise related to an automotive floor structure under deterministic (engine and road-tyre interaction) and stochastic (road-tyre interaction and aerodynamic) forcing actions.
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