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Abstract

The article refers to the idea of using the software defined network (SDN) as an effective hardware and software platform enabling the creation and dynamic management of distributed ICT infrastructure supporting the rapid prototyping process. The authors proposed a new layered reference model remote distributed rapid prototyping that allows the development of heterogeneous, open systems of rapid prototyping in a distributed environment. Next, the implementation of this model was presented in which the functioning of the bottom layers of the model is based on the SDN architecture. Laboratory tests were carried out for this implementation which allowed to verify the proposed model in the real environment, as well as determine its potential and possibilities for further development. Thus, the approach described in the paper may contribute to the development and improvement of the efficiency of rapid prototyping processes which individual components are located in remote industrial, research and development units. Thanks to this, it will be possible to better integrate production processes as well as optimize the costs associated with prototyping. The proposed solution is also a response in this regard to the needs of industry 4.0 in the area of creating scalable, controllable and reliable platforms.
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Abstract

This paper presents a new OpenFlow controller: the Distributed Active Information Model (DAIM). The DAIM controller was developed to explore the viability of a logically distributed control plane. It is implemented in a distributed way throughout a software-defined network, at the level of the switches. The method enables local process flows, by way of local packet switching, to be controlled by the distributed DAIM controller (as opposed to a centralised OpenFlow controller). The DAIM ecosystem is discussed with some sample code, together with flowcharts of the implemented algorithms. We present implementation details, a testing methodology, and an experimental evaluation. A performance analysis was conducted using the Cbench open benchmarking tool. Comparisons were drawn with respect to throughput and latency. It is concluded that the DAIM controller can handle a high throughput, while keeping the latency relatively low. We believe the results to date are potentially very interesting, especially in light of the fact that a key feature of the DAIM controller is that it is designed to enable the future development of autonomous local flow process and management strategies.
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