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Abstract

Inconel 713C precision castings are used as aircraft engine components exposed to high temperatures and the aggressive exhaust gas environment. Industrial experience has shown that precision-cast components of such complexity contain casting defects like microshrinkage, porosity, and cracks. This necessitates the development of repair technologies for castings of this type. This paper presents the results of metallographic examinations of melted areas and clad welds on the Inconel 713C nickel-based superalloy, made by TIG, plasma arc, and laser. The cladding process was carried out on model test plates in order to determine the technological and materialrelated problems connected with the weldability of Inconel 713C. The studies included analyses of the macro- and microstructure of the clad welds, the base materials, and the heat-affected zones. The results of the structural analyses of the clad welds indicate that Inconel 713C should be classified as a low-weldability material. In the clad welds made by laser, cracks were identified mainly in the heat-affected zone and at the melted zone interface, crystals were formed on partially-melted grains. Cracks of this type were not identified in the clad welds made using the plasma-arc method. It has been concluded that due to the possibility of manual cladding and the absence of welding imperfections, the technology having the greatest potential for application is plasma-arc cladding.
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Abstract

Inconel 713C is a nickel-based casting alloy characterised by improved heat and creep resistance [1]. It is used e.g. in aircraft engine components, mainly in the form of precision castings. Precision casting enables very good reproduction of complex shapes. However, due to major differences in casting wall thickness and the resultant differences in rigidity, defects can form in precision castings. The most common defects in precision castings are shrinkage porosities and microcracks. Inconel 713C is considered to be a difficult-to-weld or even non-weldable alloy. However, the need to repair precision castings requires attempts to develop technologies for their remelting and pad welding which could be used in industrial practice. This article presents the results of tests consisting in TIG pad welding of defects identified in precision castings intended for the aircraft industry. It was found that the main reason behind failed attempts at repairing precision castings by welding technologies was hot cracking in the fusion zone. Such cracks form as a result of the partial melting of intercrystalline regions along the fusion line. The deformations occurring during the crystallization of the melting-affected zone (fusion zone + partially melted zone + heat affected zone) or pad weld lead to the rupture of the intercrystalline liquid film. Hot cracks form within the so-called high-temperature brittleness range (HTBR) of the alloy. Another type of cracks that was identified were ductility dip cracks (DDC), whose formation is related to the partial melting of carbides.
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Abstract

Inconel 713C alloy belongs to the group of materials with high application potential in the aerospace industry. This nickel alloy has excellent features such as high strength, good surface stability, high creep and corrosion resistance. The paper presents the results of metallographic examinations of a base material and padding welds made by laser beam on the Inconel 713C alloy. The tests were made on precisely cast test plates imitating low - pressure turbine blades dedicated for the aerospace industry. Observations of the macro- and microstructure of the padding welds, heat-affected zone and base material indicate, that the Inconel 713C alloy should be classified as a hard-to-weld material. In the investigated joint, cracking of the material is disclosed mainly in the heat-affected zone and at the melted zone interface, where pad weld crystals formed on partially melted grains. The results show that phases rich with chromium and molybdenum were formed by high temperature during welding process, which was confirmed by EDS analysis of chemical composition.
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Abstract

Nickel-based alloys are widely used in industries such as the aircraft industry, chemicals, power generation, and others. Their stable mechanical properties in combination with high resistance to aggressive environments at high temperatures make these materials suitable for the production of components of devices and machines intended for operation in extremely difficult conditions, e.g. in aircraft engines. This paper presents the results of thermal and mechanical tests performed on precision castings made of the Inconel 713C alloy and intended for use in the production of low pressure turbine blades. The tests enabled the determination of the nil strength temperature (NST), the nil ductility temperature (NDT), and the ductility recovery temperature (DRT) of the material tested. Based on the values obtained, the high temperature brittleness range (HTBR) and the hot cracking resistance index were determined. Metallographic examinations were conducted in order to describe the cracking mechanisms. It was found that the main cracking mechanism was the partial melting of grains and subsequently the rupture of a thin liquid film along crystal boundaries as a result of deformation during crystallisation. Another cracking mechanism identified was the DDC (Ductility Dip Cracking) mechanism. The results obtained provide a basis for improving precision casting processes for aircraft components and constitute guidelines for designers, engineers, and casting technologists.
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