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Number of results: 4
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Abstract

The aim of this study is to design a control strategy for the angular rate (speed) of a DC motor by varying the terminal voltage. This paper describes various designs for the control of direct current (DC) motors. We derive a transfer function for the system and connect it to a controller as feedback, taking the applied voltage as the system input and the angular velocity as the output. Different strategies combining proportional, integral, and derivative controllers along with phase lag compensators and lead integral compensators are investigated alongside the linear quadratic regulator. For each controller transfer function, the step response, root locus, and Bode plot are analysed to ascertain the behaviour of the system, and the results are compared to identify the optimal strategy. It is found that the linear quadratic controller provides the best overall performance in terms of steady-state error, response time, and system stability. The purpose of the study that took place was to design the most appropriate controller for the steadiness of DC motors. Throughout this study, analytical means like tuning methods, loop control, and stability criteria were adopted. The reason for this was to suffice the preconditions and obligations. Furthermore, for the sake of verifying the legitimacy of the controller results, modelling by MATLAB and Simulink was practiced on every controller.
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Abstract

Switched reluctance motors (SRMs) are still under development to maximise their already proven usefulness.Amagnetic circuit of theSRMcan be made of soft magnetic composites (SMCs). The SMCs are composed of iron powder with dielectric and have a lot of advantages in comparison to commonly used electrical steel. The paper deals with the modelling and analysis of theSRMproduced by Emerson Electric Co. forwashing machines. Numerical calculations and modelling were done using the FEMM 4.2 program. Magnetic flux densities and magnetic flux lines were calculated, as well as electromagnetic torque and inductance for changing the position of a stator to a rotor. The obtained results were compared with other measurement results and are quite similar. The developed numerical model will be used for the project of a motor with an SMC magnetic circuit.
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Abstract

This paper focuses on testing the monitoring system of the Direct Current motor. This system gives the possibility of diagnosing various types of failures by means of analysis of acoustic signals. The applied method is based on a study of acoustic signals generated by the DC motor. A study plan of the DC motor’s acoustic signal was proposed. Studies were conducted for a faultless DC motor and Direct Current motor with 3 shorted rotor coils. Coiflet wavelet transform and K-Nnearest neighbor classifier with Euclidean distance were used to identify the incipient fault. This approach keeps the motor operating in acceptable condition for a long time and is also inexpensive.
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Abstract

Maximum Torque Control (MTC) is a new method applied for control of induction motor drives. The drive is controlled by dc voltage supplying a converter in the range below nominal speed and by a field that weakens for a speed range above the nominal speed. As a consequence, the control is quite similar to the control of a classical separately excited dc motor. This control method could be explained as a kind of sim- plification of Direct Torque Control (DTC), because the switching scheme is the same as for the DTC, but the variable responsible for a torque control is constantly set for “torque increase”. This kind of control of induction motor drive is simpler than DTC because torque values need not be estimated. The proposed control method offers very good performance for 3-phase induction motors and requires smaller switching frequency in comparison to DTC and Field Oriented Control (FOC). The application of the con- trol is widely demonstrated for a 3-phase 315 kW, 6 kV motor drive by use of computer simulation.
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