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Abstract

The effects of Mg and Ca on sulfide modification of sulphur steel were studied to elucidate the difference between micromagnesium treatment and micro-calcium treatment for the inclusion of sulphur steel. The results show that the inclusions in the steel appeared with an oxide core of Al2O3 and MnS wrapped. After the addition of Mg, the core was changed to spinel, and the MnS coating was changed to Mn-Mg-S. After Ca was added, the core was changed to Ca-Al-O, and the MnS coating was changed to Mn-Ca-S. The Mg content was higher than Ca content in the sulfides of the steel. Therefore, Mg was more effective than Ca in terms of sulfide modification with the same content of Mg and Ca in steel, but the yielding rate of Mg was lower than that of Ca. The Mg content in the oxide core was higher than Mg of the coating of the inclusions in the steel treated with Mg or Mg-Ca. In contrast, the Ca content in the oxide core was lower than Ca of the coating of the inclusions in the steel treated with Ca or Mg-Ca. MnS formed and precipitated during the melt solidification process. The complex sulfide (Mg-Mn-S) was precipitated around MgO·Al2O3 in the Mg treated steel during the cooling process. CaS inclusion was precipitated on the CaO·Al2O3 inclusions in the liquid Ca-treated steel. Thus, CaS was formed first, whereas MnS was formed during the cooling process, followed by the formation of complex sulfide (CaS+MnS), which finally precipitated around CaO·Al2O3 in the Ca-treated steel.
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Abstract

Recycling construction and demolition waste not only reduces project costs; and saves natural resources, but also solves the environmental threat caused by construction waste disposal. In this paper, C25 waste road concrete is used as an experimental material, the uniaxial compression strength and tensile splitting strength of C25 RAC whose coarse aggregate replacement rate is 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% are tested under the condition that the water-to-cement ratio is 0.47, 0.55 and 0.61. The results show: (1) the uniaxial compression strength and tensile splitting strength decrease with the increase of RAC; (2) for concrete with the same water-to-cement ratio, when the coarse aggregate replacement rate changes from 0% to 50%, the uniaxial compression strength and tensile splitting strength of RAC changes slightly. When the coarse aggregate replacement rate changes from 50% to 100%, the uniaxial compression strength and tensile splitting strength of RAC decreases rapidly
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